Author Archives: clairetbartlett

Alphabetical List of Titles

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The Adoration of Jenna Fox by Mary E. Pearson
AP (magazine)
Au Revoir Crazy European Chick
Beautiful Creatures (movie)
Big Girl Small by Rachel DeWoskin
Black Helicopters by Blythe Woolston
Blurred Lines by Robin Thicke (CD)
Butter by Erin Jade Lange
Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein
The Contender by Robert Lipsyte
Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Ferguson’s Career Guidance Center (database)
Game by Walter Dean Myers
Gorgeous by Paul Rudnick
Halo: Reach (video game)
High Voltage Tattoo by Kat Von D
Hope in Patience by Beth Fehlbaum
I am the Messenger by Markus Zusak
I hunt Killers by Barry Lyga
I Just hope it’s lethal edited by Liz Rosenberg and Deena November
The Interrupters (movie)
Issues and Controversies (database) 
Justine (magazine)
Keeping the Castle by Patrice Kindl
The Heist by Macklemore and Ryan Lewis (CD)
King of the Mild Frontier by Chris Crutcher
Little Brother by Cory Doctorow
Louder than a Bomb (movie)
Madness Underneath by Maureen Johnson
Mangaman by Barry Lyga
Mango Languages (database)
Marvel Ultimate Alliance (video game)
Miseducation of Cameron Post by emily m. dansforth
Need for Speed-Hot Pursuit (video game)
Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist by David Levithan and Rachel Cohn
Night Visions by Imagine Dragons (CD)
No Choirboy by Susan Kuklin 
Notes from the Midnight Driver by Jordan Sonneblick
Nothing can possibly go wrong by Prudence Shen and Faith Erin Hicks
Novelist (database)
OCD, the Dude, and Me by Lauren Roedy Vaughn
Pink by Lili Wilkinson
The Poison Eaters by Holly Black
Saved (movie)
Seraphina by Rachel Hartman
Spiderman (movie)
Teen Vogue (magazine)
Tina’s Mouth by Keshni Kashyap
Under the Mesquite by Guadalupe Garcia McCall

Blurred Lines by Robin Thicke (CD)

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blurred lines

Blurred Lines by Robin Thicke ISBN: 602537424788

Overview: This album is rooted in R&B and the soul of the 1970s. The album has a casual and lighthearted feel, while also infusing more bass and synthesizers to make it more danceable. The title track of this album achieved something rare for an R&B single these days in reaching the #1 spot on the Billboard charts. Blurred Lines, “contains a motley assortment of high-gloss dance tracks seemingly made for pop-chart contention,” according to the review by Andy Kellman.

Track List:

1 Blurred Lines
2 Take It Easy on Me
3 Ooo La La
4 Ain’t No Hat 4 That
5 Get in My Way
6 Give It 2 U
7 Feel Good
8 Go Stupid 4 U
9 For the Rest of My Life
10 Top of the World
11 Good Life

Critical Evaluation: I found the best tracks on here to be “Blurred Lines” and “Top of the World.” Both are somewhat catchy, the title track being more of a danceable song, and “Top of the World” with a nice piano melody in the background and lighthearted lyrics. The title track is meant to remind the listener of Marvin Gaye’s disco-funk groove in “Got to give it up.” However, I did not really enjoy most of the songs on this album. I found them to be rather repetitive and predictable. Robin has a reputation as a songwriter, but I found lyrics to be inconsequential, bland, and in many cases, overly sexualized. Many of the earlier songs have Robin singing almost entirely in falsetto. These earlier songs incorporate more electronic elements. “Ain’t no hat for that,” seems to talk about a shallow woman; three songs towards the end seem to be more positive and seem to be about Robin’s wife and outlook on life. I can appreciate these songs from that standpoint, though none of it is really my musical preference. A review of the album by Andy Kellman argues that none of these songs are Robin’s best. Without having listened to any of his other music, I hope he’s right.

Reader’s Annotation: Blurred Lines features danceable songs with heavy beats and more lighthearted melodic tunes for R&B and New Soul fans. 

Information about the author: Robin Thicke is the son of vocalist and actress Gloria Loring and theme song composer and actor Alan Thicke. He grew up in suburban Los Angeles. Brian McKnight heard a demo he recorded at 14 years old and helped Robin get a recording deal with Interscope Records.

Previous to 2000 he experienced most success as a songwriter for other artists. He released several albums before finding success on the charts with “The Evolution of Robin Thicke.” Andy Kellman writes, “Thicke then settled into a lengthy career as a widely respected artist — with occasional diversions into humorous, self-aware showboating — who remained true to his root influences while occasionally departing from ’70s-indebted stylistic comfort zone.”

Genre: Pop, R &B Music

Curriculum ties, if any: This could be examined in a music class.

Booktalking Ideas: I could see fans of mainstream dance music and R&B enjoying this music.

Reading Level/Interest Age:  The lyrics of this album make this more appropriate for older teens.

Challenge Issues:

  • Sexual situations
  • Some language

Defense Strategy:

  1. First, I would want to be familiar with the album. As I’ve listened to this album, I’d be aware of potential issues that could be challenged. In the case of an album I had not listened to, I would want to have access to reviews.
  2. Then I would put together a rationale for why this album is included in the collection. This rationale would include:
    • Bibliographic Citation of the album.
    • A description of who the album is best suited for.
    • A summary of the album and applicable other information, such as biographical information about the author.
    • My justification for including the album. This would include how it fits in with the selection policy and library mission statement, and include its educational significance if applicable or the impact it could have on readers.
    • Copy of selection policy and library mission statement at my library.
    • ALA Library Bill of Rights
    • Good and bad reviews of the album
    • Alternative works a student could listen to
    • Reconsideration form if patron is not satisfied with rationale
  3. When talking to patron, I would listen to their concerns without getting on the defensive and attempt to sympathize with their concerns. In some cases, all an upset patron needs is to be able to vent and know that someone is listening to them.
  4. If needed, I would send the challenge up the chain of command.

This album meets the recreational needs of teens.

Why did you include this album? : It is very popular so it represents something teen librarians should be aware of.

Reference Page:

Kellman, A. (2013). Artist biography of Robin Thicke. All Music. Retrieved from http://www.allmusic.com/artist/robin-thicke-mn0000238686/biography

Kellman, A. (2013). Blurred Lines review. All Music. Retrieved from http://www.allmusic.com/album/blurred-lines-mw0002518827

Tina’s Mouth by Keshni Kashyap

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Tina's Mouth

Tina’s Mouth by Keshni Kashyap, ISBN: 9780618945191

Overview: Tina is a shrewd observer of high school culture, with its cliques and fashion obsessed shallow people. She’s recently been dumped by her best friend, Alex, so she has plenty of time to compose a journal to Jean-Paul Sartre as an English class assignment. In it, she’ll muse about her older brother and sister’s troubles with love, her embarrassing extended family, and the boy she likes but can’t seem to figure out. Tina writes with wit and just enough angst to make this a fun and enlightening read.

Critical Evaluation: There is not much new territory covered in this graphic novel, but it is still an enjoyable story. Tina’s issues are familiar, though they are seen through the lens of an Indian American family. So her brother and sister experience dating woes, just like anyone else, but they are mostly caused by their parents’ attempts to arrange a marriage. Or there is Tina’s breakdown of all of her aunts, from the gossiping ones, to the drunken aunt who hands out advice like, “Marry a European.” Even with familiar tropes, I like the way Tina thinks about things and infuses every situation with the snark and eye rolls so characteristic of teens.

Some reviews on Goodreads have complained about the drawings of the book. I had no issues with them and found that I thought they matched the text quite well. They are more basic, but this is a style common in many other illustrated novels, like Persepolis or from the children’s section, Diary of a Wimpy Kid. That the book is supposed to represent a teen’s journal lends even more credibility to the simplicity of the illustrations. That in itself is also very reminiscent of Daria, which I assume must be an influence on this novel.

Reader’s Annotation: Tina contemplates high school, her embarrassing family, and why she can’t understand boys in a journal addressed to Jean-Paul Sartre. This may be one of the funniest class assignment you’ll read.

Information about the author: Keshni was born to Indian parents and raised in the San Francisco area. She studied literature at Berkeley and film at UCLA. She now lives and works in New York City.

“Tina’s Mouth” is her first novel. She is primarily known as a filmmaker. She also contributes frequently to “The Daily Beast” website.

Genre: Graphic Novel, Humor, Realistic Fiction

Curriculum ties, if any: Tina creates this journal for his English honors class assignment on existentialism, so this could be a fun way to talk about existentialism and Jean-Paul Sartre.

Booktalking Ideas: Tina is very reminiscent of Daria, and even though Daria was current when I was in high school, I think she remains popular in a cult sense. For those who hadn’t heard of Daria, I would emphasize how funny and snarky she is.

Reading Level/Interest Age:  Tina is a sophomore in high school and deals with issues common to high school students. The expressed purpose of the book from Tina’s perspective is for an existentialism assignment, which I think will resonate more with older teens.

Challenge Issues:

  • Language
  • Drug references
  • Sexual references

Defense Strategy:

  1. First, I would want to be familiar with the book. As I’ve read this book, I’d be aware of potential issues that could be challenged. In the case of a book I had not read, I would want to have access to reviews.
  2. Then I would put together a rationale for why this book is included in the collection. This rationale would include:
    • Bibliographic Citation of the book.
    • A description of who the book is best suited for.
    • A summary of the book and applicable other information, such as biographical information about the author.
    • My justification for including the book. This would include how it fits in with the selection policy and library mission statement, and include its educational significance if applicable or the impact it could have on readers.
    • Copy of selection policy and library mission statement at my library.
    • ALA Library Bill of Rights
    • Good and bad reviews of the book
    • Alternative works a student could read
    • Reconsideration form if patron is not satisfied with rationale
  3. When talking to patron, I would listen to their concerns without getting on the defensive and attempt to sympathize with their concerns. In some cases, all an upset patron needs is to be able to vent and know that someone is listening to them.
  4. If needed, I would send the challenge up the chain of command.

This book meets the recreational needs of teens. I also think that the controversial elements included are commonplace in some teens’ lives, and deserve representation in the books that they read.

Why did you include this book? : It was recommended to me and seemed like it would provide another angle to my project. It also provides the perspective of a non-white teenager.

Reference Page:

Keshni Kashyap author biography (2013). Goodreads. Retrieved from http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/2867364.Keshni_Kashyap

The Heist by Macklemore and Ryan Lewis

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Macklemore - The Heist

The Heist by Macklemore and Ryan Lewis, ASIN: B009G78EE2

Overview: Macklemore and Ryan Lewis have created a genre bending rap album with reflective intelligent songs, and catchy songs you’ll hear on the radio or in the club. The album features many different guest artists, like Mary Lambert and Ab-Soul.

Track List:

1 Ten Thousand Hours
2 Can’t Hold Us
3 Thrift Shop
4 Thin Line
5 Same Love
6 Make the Money
7 Neon Cathedral
8 Bombom
9 White Walls
10 Jimmy Iovine
11 Wing$
12 Wake
13 Gold
14 Starting Over
15 Cowboy Boots

Critical Evaluation: These songs are generally catchy, danceable, and frequently have a deeper message. Songs like “Same Love” advocate for same sex marriage, while others address Macklemore’s addiction issues, the recording industry, or race. “Thrift Shop” and “Can’t Hold Us” are the songs I’d heard beforehand, both good for dancing. “Thrift Shop” is funny but also smart, demonstrating Macklemore’s ability to make fun of himself. Songs like “Thin Line” are more melodic and slow, but no less catchy. Ryan Lewis contributes dynamic beats and inventive ideas for the trajectory of the songs. Each song sounds differently from the next one, and from a lot of other popular rap songs. Most of the songs have explicit language and some sexual situations.

Reader’s Annotation: Macklemore and Ryan Lewis create dynamic beats, catchy and intelligent lyrics, and danceable songs for a discerning pop and rap listener.

Information about the author: Macklemore was born Ben Haggerty and is based in Seattle. He debuted as Professor Macklemore in 2000. His 2012 album climbed the Billboard charts with little mainstream support.

Much of his more commercial success is credited to his frequent collaborator, Ryan Lewis, the producer on this album. He is also a Washington native. His creative interests have ranged from guitar to audio production to photography from his teens to his twenties. His interest in production was rekindled during a photo shoot with Macklemore, and the rest is evident

Genre: Rap Pop CD

Curriculum ties, if any: This could be looked at in a music class for its inventive and genre bending qualities.

Booktalking Ideas: I would play either “Can’t Stop Us” or “Thrift Shop” and “A Wake” to demonstrate the spectrum of this album.

Reading Level/Interest Age:  The lyrics of this album make this more appropriate for older teens.

Challenge Issues:

  • Language
  • Drug and alcohol use
  • Sexual situations

Defense Strategy:

  1. First, I would want to be familiar with the album. As I’ve listened to this album, I’d be aware of potential issues that could be challenged. In the case of an album I had not listened to, I would want to have access to reviews.
  2. Then I would put together a rationale for why this album is included in the collection. This rationale would include:
    • Bibliographic Citation of the album.
    • A description of who the album is best suited for.
    • A summary of the album and applicable other information, such as biographical information about the author.
    • My justification for including the album. This would include how it fits in with the selection policy and library mission statement, and include its educational significance if applicable or the impact it could have on readers.
    • Copy of selection policy and library mission statement at my library.
    • ALA Library Bill of Rights
    • Good and bad reviews of the album
    • Alternative works a student could listen to
    • Reconsideration form if patron is not satisfied with rationale
  3. When talking to patron, I would listen to their concerns without getting on the defensive and attempt to sympathize with their concerns. In some cases, all an upset patron needs is to be able to vent and know that someone is listening to them.
  4. If needed, I would send the challenge up the chain of command.

This album meets the recreational needs of teens. It also has a lot of smart lyrics and ideas that would be good for reflection. I think Macklemore and Ryan Lewis’ grassroots success would also be inspiring for teen musicians, so it’s important for teens to have access to.

Why did you include this book? : It is very popular so it represents something teen librarians should be aware of.

Reference Page:

Jeffries, D. (2013). Macklemore’s artist biography. All Music. Retrieved from http://www.allmusic.com/artist/macklemore-mn0001015772/biography

Jeffries, D. (2013). Ryan Lewis’ artist biography. All Music. Retrieved from http://www.allmusic.com/artist/ryan-lewis-mn0002159538/biography

Under the Mesquite by Guadalupe Garcia McCall

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Under the Mesquite

Under the Mesquite by Guadalupe Garcia McCall ISBN: 9781600604294

Plot Summary: When Lupita’s mother gets cancer, Lupita finds herself taking care of her seven younger siblings while her father cares for their mother. She juggles this with high school homework, her dreams to be an actress, and friends who don’t understand what’s changed. She finds quiet and time to reflect under a mesquite tree in the backyard. The poems that she writes help her to deal with all the responsibilities and her fears of losing her mother forever.

Critical Evaluation: In general, I love poetry, but I have a harder time with novels in verse. It is hard to write a beautiful and evocative poem that also gets across plot points and character development of a longer story. These poems are skillfully and sometimes artfully written, but their main purpose is really to get across the story. There are metaphors and vibrant images, like when Lupita compares herself to a dormant cicada, or babies to pennies from heaven. Like many other novels in verse, I find this one to simply be a more thoughtfully worded and differently structured novel. I don’t mean this to be an insult. I just mean that it doesn’t fit the idea I have of a poem in my head.

As for the story, it is a fascinating one and valuable topic for a teen. I think most are somewhat oblivious to the possibility that their parents could get sick and not be able to care for them. As teens get older, they do transition to having more responsibilities, and testing the waters of being an adult. So contemplating adding responsibilities to those you already have is scary, but good to contemplate. This story adeptly demonstrates the practical and emotional burdens added, and offers ideas of how to cope.

Lupita is remarkably good at adapting to her new responsibilities, even though she struggles with them. This is established to a certain extent when we learn that she frequently helps her parents with taking care of the household, even before her mother gets sick, but still feels surprising. With a novel in verse, and the shorter story usually inherent in this style, there is less room to provide details. The reader must take emotions on face value and assume that there is more lurking between the lines. I occasionally encourage reluctant readers to read novels in verse, but the more I consider them, the more I wonder if you need to be a little more skilled at inference when you undertake a book like this one.

Reader’s Annotation: Lupita has always helped her parents around the house. But now Lupita’s mother has cancer, and she finds herself juggling schoolwork, housework, and taking care of her seven younger brothers and sisters.

Information about the author (taken from book jacket and Goodreads): Guadalupe Garcia McCall was born in Coahuila, Mexico. Her family moved to Texas when she was a young girl. She attended Sul Rose State University to study theater arts, English and get a teacher’s certificate.

She now teaches English and Language Arts at a junior high school. She lives with her husband and three sons in the San Antonio, Texas area. This novel was inspired by the experiences of Guadalupe’s family during her teen years.

Genre: Realistic Fiction, Novel in Verse

Curriculum ties, if any: I would associate this with a poetry unit, or perhaps conversation about responsibilities and family.

Booktalking Ideas: I would promote this book for readers of poetry and other verse novels, like Ellen Hopkins’ books. I would also appeal to reader’s empathetic sides by asking them to imagine what they would do if one of their parents got sick and they needed to take care of their siblings.

Reading Level/Interest Age: Lupita is in high school, and deals with things that most younger readers don’t have to think about, so I think in that sense it can appeal to an older reader. The lack of language or controversial elements make it appropriate for younger readers as well.  School Library Journal recommends this book for readers in grades 7 and up.

Challenge Issues: None

Why did you include this book? : I wanted to include a story in verse, since I think this is becoming a popular method of storytelling, and one that might appeal to reluctant readers. This book also incorporates the Mexican American immigrant story not present in any of my other selections.

Reference Page:

Biography for Guadalupe Garcia McCall (2013). Goodreads. Retrieved from http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/2924895.Guadalupe_Garcia_McCall

OCD, the Dude, and Me by Lauren Roedy Vaughn

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OCD, the Dude, and Me

OCD, the Dude, and Me by Lauren Roedy Vaughn, ISBN: 9780803738430

Plot Summary: Danielle and her mother get in a fight on the first day of school because of the mess in Danielle’s room. But what her mother doesn’t understand is that what she sees as mess is a carefully organized system for Danielle’s books. Many things in Danielle’s life are carefully handled, like her weight, her style of dress, and her lack of friends. As a result of her essays in class, her English teacher decides that Danielle should see a counselor and join a social skills class. Both seem like a waste of time, until Danielle meets Daniel. He introduces her to “The Big Lebowski” and friendship. This book is told in a quirky and funny style, with a lovably flawed narrator on a heartfelt journey.

Critical Evaluation: This book is told through a variety of formats. Danielle explains at the beginning that she is keeping a color coded binder to capture her life. This includes diary entries, letters to her aunt, and the essays that she writes for her English class, along with comments and grades from the teacher. This provides for an interesting look at her, and an interesting form of narration. Like “Notes,” this means that we see different sides of Danielle. However, the further we read, the more we see that she doesn’t really censor or change her language in her class essays, which also demonstrates something about Danielle’s character.

The other element of the book I find most interesting is the way important details are revealed to the reader as the story progresses. I had a feeling that there was more to the story, and more to Danielle’s neuroses than was established initially. I have to commend the author because I did not guess what her actual traumatic event would be beforehand. At the same time, the resolution of the story seems too neat and easy. I won’t spoil anything I haven’t already, but it seemed like all it took for most of Danielle’s issues to fade was one friend.

Reader’s Annotation: Danielle confines her whole life to her color coded binder. Can she make room for friends and all the unpredictable elements of life?

Information about the author (from book jacket): Lauren Roedy Vaughn is an award-winning educator who has spent twenty years teaching English to high school students with language-based learning disabilities. Lauren lives with her husband in Los Angeles, where she is an avid yogini and Big Lebowski nut.

Genre: Realistic Fiction, Humor

Curriculum ties, if any: This would have ties to a journal writing assignment in an English class, or possibly a look at mental health.

Booktalking Ideas: The second half of the book incorporates a lot of “Big Lebowski” references, so for teens who love that movie, I think the book would appeal as well. I would emphasize that it is funny but heartfelt, and enjoyable to read.

Reading Level/Interest Age:  Danielle is a senior in high school. Because of the challenge issues listed below, it may be more appropriate for a high school student. Publisher’s Weekly recommends this for ages 14 and up, and School Library Journal for grades 9 and up.

Challenge Issues:

  • Language
  • Drug Use
  • Mention of sexual situations

Defense Strategy:

  1. First, I would want to be familiar with the book. As I’ve read this book, I’d be aware of potential issues that could be challenged. In the case of a book I had not read, I would want to have access to reviews.
  2. Then I would put together a rationale for why this book is included in the collection. This rationale would include:
    • Bibliographic Citation of the book.
    • A description of who the book is best suited for.
    • A summary of the book and applicable other information, such as biographical information about the author.
    • My justification for including the book. This would include how it fits in with the selection policy and library mission statement, and include its educational significance if applicable or the impact it could have on readers.
    • Copy of selection policy and library mission statement at my library.
    • ALA Library Bill of Rights
    • Good and bad reviews of the book
    • Alternative works a student could read
    • Reconsideration form if patron is not satisfied with rationale
  3. When talking to patron, I would listen to their concerns without getting on the defensive and attempt to sympathize with their concerns. In some cases, all an upset patron needs is to be able to vent and know that someone is listening to them.
  4. If needed, I would send the challenge up the chain of command.

I think this is one of those books that you want to have on hand for teens that have experienced things like Danielle has. I imagine it will feel good to see someone in the pages of a book who has OCD, has experienced traumatic things, and who struggles to keep everything together. The language and other controversial elements just add to the authenticity of the book.

Why did you include this book? : It received a lot of positive reviews and sounded interesting. It also deals with mental health.

Marvel Ultimate Alliance (video game)

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Marvel Ultimate Alliance

Ultimate Marvel Alliance (video game) ISBN: 047875821316

Overview: You are Marvel superhero, interacting with other characters from the Marvel universe. The story begins with an attack on the S.H.I.E.L.D. Helicarrier by Dr. Doom and the Masters of Evil. Nick Fury, director of S.H.I.E.L.D. sends out a distress call and Captain America, Thor, Wolverine, and Spider-man respond and save the Helicarrier. Nick Fury then puts together a task force to confront the Masters of Evil. As a team of heroes, either playing cooperatively with other local players or alone, you travel to several places and battle villains. There are 140 characters you can play as, though some players become unlocked the more levels that you beat. This game was released in 2006, and has since been followed by a sequel in 2008.

Critical Evaluation: This is a fun game that should definitely appeal to Marvel and comic book fans. The plot is generally well developed and authentic to the comic. Almost every Marvel main character shows up at some point during the game, whether you are able to play as them or encounter them in your travels. Probably the biggest change is that some of these characters never cross paths in their actual storylines. And with each different player comes different skills that are related to the skills they actually have in the comics. Characters talk a little bit during sequences, with voices that seem authentic to each character, though they can repeat themselves a lot.

The plot is also a little repetitive, in that at each level, you are doing basically the same thing, and fighting villains. Each level is in a different place and with a different villain, but there doesn’t seem to be much development beyond that. Besides the main battles, there are other ways of earning points in the levels, like by collecting coins that happen when you smash particular items in the game. But that only adds a momentary distraction from the main objective. I would warrant that this is a somewhat common problem for role player games like this.

Reader’s Annotation: Battle Dr. Doom and the Masters of Evil as your favorite Marvel superhero!

Information about the creators: This game was developed by Raven software and published by Activision. They were founded in 1990, and acquired by Activision in 1997. Some of their other video games include Call of Duty, Star Wars Jedi Knight, and Singularity.

Genre: Action Role Player Video game (RPG)

Curriculum ties, if any: None

Booktalking Ideas: I would emphasize the variety of Marvel characters that are involved in this video game. Besides the particular characters, there is nothing terribly unique about this game, but those who are interested in Marvel Comics should enjoy the plot tie-ins.

Reading Level/Interest Age:  This is categorized as a YA video game at my library.

Challenge Issues:

  • Violence

Defense Strategy:

  1. First, I would want to be familiar with the video game. As I’ve played this game, I’d be aware of potential issues that could be challenged. In the case of a game I had not played, I would want to have access to reviews.
  2. Then I would put together a rationale for why this game is included in the collection. This rationale would include:
    • Bibliographic Citation of the game.
    • A description of who the game is best suited for.
    • A summary of the game and applicable other information, such as biographical information about the creators.
    • My justification for including the game. This would include how it fits in with the selection policy and library mission statement, and include its educational significance if applicable or the impact it could have on readers.
    • Copy of selection policy and library mission statement at my library.
    • ALA Library Bill of Rights
    • Good and bad reviews of the game
    • Alternative works a student could play
    • Reconsideration form if patron is not satisfied with rationale
  3. When talking to patron, I would listen to their concerns without getting on the defensive and attempt to sympathize with their concerns. In some cases, all an upset patron needs is to be able to vent and know that someone is listening to them.
  4. If needed, I would send the challenge up the chain of command.

This game meets the recreational needs of teens. As with other games that incorporate violence, it may also be a healthier outlet for aggression.

Why did you include this video game? : I wanted to demonstrate an example of a role player game that was based on popular characters and more storyline driven.

Reference Page:

Raven Software (2013). Wikipedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raven_Software