Category Archives: Movie

Saved (movie)

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Saved

Saved directed by Brian Dannelly ISBN: 0792861930

Plot Summary: Mary attends American Eagle Christian High School with her best friend Hilary Faye and boyfriend Dean. She’s popular, involved in extracurricular activities, goes to church, and gets along with her mom. When Dean tells her that he thinks he’s gay, Mary has a vision telling her to save Dean…which leads to them having sex and Mary getting pregnant. When Hilary Faye finds out, she rejects Mary and enlists the help of others to try and “save” her. Now Mary must rely on the school outcasts, Cassandra, the only Jewish person at her school and Hilary’s Faye’s brother, Roland, who is confined to a wheelchair for friendship and help in navigating this new development. When her teacher’s cute new son joins the class, Mary’s life gets even more complicated.

Critical Evaluation: This movie is narrated by Mary, and it provides a great direction and frame for the story. Initially, she thinks of herself as wholesome and devoted to her religion the way she’s been taught to believe. You see her tagging along with Hilary Faye and idolizing her. Everything changes when Dean is sent away to a school for homosexuals, and she finds out that she is pregnant. You see her transformation from feeling like a blessed person to one that maybe God forgot. Her friendship with Cassandra and Roland comes on suddenly, but I think we can tell that Mary is wounded and lonely and in need of any support. It’s surprising that it comes from the brash and inappropriate Cassandra, but she turns out to be the most accepting person, because she doesn’t have a religious filter through which to judge Mary. It’s interesting to see how quickly Mary adjusts to having Cassandra and Roland as friends, never quite idolizing them to the same extent as Hilary Faye, but still adapting herself to fit in better with them.

The religious element of this movie is certain to be touchy for some. Mary sort of loses her faith in the middle of the story, and her savior ends up being the least religious person in the movie. That being said, she returns to Christianity, and finds others in the faith that are more accepting of differences in others’ lives. I would think that people would appreciate this message, but it will depend on the Christian. For me, it makes her faith that much more powerful, because she has thought about it more critically and incorporated elements that are important to her, while eschewing those that don’t fit her new outlook on life (But I’m just a heathen, so my opinion won’t be shared by everyone).

Reader’s Annotation: Imagine going to a Christian high school and being a member of the “Christian Jewels,” and then getting pregnant. Welcome to Mary’s new life. This sweet and funny film explores accepting yourself and others, even if things don’t turn out quite the way you planned them.

Information about the director: Brian Dannelly was born in Wurtzberg, Germany. He moved to Baltimore, Maryland at the age of 11. He attended several schools and changed his major several times before completing his bachelor’s degree in visual arts from the University of Maryland Baltimore County.

He created several short films before writing Saved with his longtime collaborator Michael Urban. It was his first feature film. He continues to write and direct films.

Genre:  Realistic Movie, Comedy

Curriculum ties, if any: I think this movie would spark great debates about religion…but that isn’t exactly appropriate for a public school class.

Booktalking Ideas: With movies that have situational elements like this one, I would gravitate towards trying to get teens to empathize with Mary, but I would also want to highlight the comedy and notable members of the cast, like Mandy Moore and Macaulay Culkin.

Reading Level/Interest Age:  Mary is a senior at her high school, and some of the topics make this more appropriate for an older viewer.

Challenge Issues:

  • Sexual Content
  • Language
  • Drug and alcohol use
  • Teen Pregnancy
  • Homosexuality

Defense Strategy:

  1. First, I would want to be familiar with the movie. As I’ve seen this movie, I’d be aware of potential issues that could be challenged. In the case of an item I was not familiar with, I would want to have access to reviews.
  2. Then I would put together a rationale for why this movie is included in the collection. This rationale would include:
    • Bibliographic Citation of the movie.
    • A description of who the movie is best suited for.
    • A summary of the movie and applicable other information, such as biographical information about the director.
    • My justification for including the movie. This would include how it fits in with the selection policy and library mission statement, and include its educational significance if applicable or the impact it could have on readers.
    • Copy of selection policy and library mission statement at my library.
    • ALA Library Bill of Rights
    • Good and bad reviews of the movie
    • Alternative works a student could read or watch
    • Reconsideration form if patron is not satisfied with rationale
  3. When talking to patron, I would listen to their concerns without getting on the defensive and attempt to sympathize with their concerns. In some cases, all an upset patron needs is to be able to vent and know that someone is listening to them.
  4. If needed, I would send the challenge up the chain of command.

I don’t think anyone could confuse this movie with one that encourages teens to get pregnant. Mary suffers socially and physically as a result of her pregnancy. I think that some may be offended by the portrayal of Christianity in this movie, although it is a complex issue that shows some Christians as being very accepting, and others as struggling to find acceptance. I think it has an important story, about the consequences of our actions, but also about learning to be more open minded.

Why did you include this movie? : I think it is a great movie with a difficult premise that manages to still be funny.

Reference Page:

Biography for Brian Dannelly (2013). Internet Movie Database. Retrieved from http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0200380/bio

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Beautiful Creatures (movie)

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beautiful creatures

Beautiful Creatures directed by ISBN: 9781622243037

Plot Summary: Everyone believes Lena, the newcomer to town, to be trouble. She is from the Duchannes family, which is rumored to be involved in dark magic. That doesn’t matter to Ethan. His town is boring enough, and she reminds him of a girl he’s been seeing in his dreams, a girl he believes he is supposed to find. The two realize that they can read each other’s minds and share the same visions when they touch of two star crossed lovers from the Civil War. It turns out the rumors are right; Lena is from a family of spell casters, and on her 16th birthday she will either turn Light or Dark. Most of her family would like to see her turn Light, but her mother and cousin have other plans, and have some tricks up their sleeves. Can Lena find a way to keep from turning dark? Can she save Ethan from dying as a result of her turning?

Critical Evaluation: This was not my kind of movie. I’m not generally interested in supernatural or paranormal love stories, though I will read some if they come highly recommended. I had heard mixed responses from my coworkers about this book, but since the movie just came out on DVD, I thought it would be a good representation of the kind of teen book adaptations that are currently being made. I struggled with the main characters’ innate attraction to each other. I need love (or friendship) to be proven to me, and find it hard to suspend disbelief when it comes to plots where the main characters just know that they are in love in their guts. So, from the start, I had an issue with that, which was somewhat difficult to look past.

I also felt like the dialogue was a little stilted. With storylines that involve love at first sight, I find that the way those lovers interact usually rings rather false. This movie incorporated a bit of small talk, getting to know conversation, but very quickly turned into serious, relationship conversations of the “But Daddy I love him!” variety. For someone who liked the book and this kind of story, I imagine that the movie is satisfying. Actors are talented and there is quite a bit of action throughout the movie, with scenes like Lena losing her temper and shattering the classroom windows pretty early on. The climax of the story was exciting and, as the books are sequels, left enough on the table to wonder about, while still resolving all the most pressing issues.

Reader’s Annotation: Everyone says Lena Duchannes is trouble; a witch. But Ethan knows she is the girl he has dreamt about, and that they are meant to be together, no matter the obstacles. And there are obstacles: dark witches, the uppity members of the town, and a curse that could kill Ethan.

Information about the director: Richard LaGavenese was born in 1959 in Brooklyn, New York. He is most well-known for his screenplays. He has been nominated for an Academy Award for his original screenplay of “The Fisher King.” He is currently married with one daughter.

Genre:  Fantasy Movie

Curriculum ties, if any: It is an interesting portrayal of the south and the culture there. It also brings up the Civil War and has a reenactment, but I can’t really see this being related enough in that sense. Perhaps the history surrounding the spell casters is based in mythology, which could be explored in a history class or religious studies class.

Booktalking Ideas: The book has been compared to “Twilight,” so I might mention that. Otherwise, I would play the trailer.

Reading Level/Interest Age:  Characters are sophomores in high school.

Challenge Issues:

  • Witch like characters
  • Violence
  • Sexual Material

Defense Strategy:

  1. First, I would want to be familiar with the movie. As I’ve seen this movie, I’d be aware of potential issues that could be challenged. In the case of an item I was not familiar with, I would want to have access to reviews.
  2. Then I would put together a rationale for why this movie is included in the collection. This rationale would include:
    • Bibliographic Citation of the movie.
    • A description of who the movie is best suited for.
    • A summary of the movie and applicable other information, such as biographical information about the director.
    • My justification for including the movie. This would include how it fits in with the selection policy and library mission statement, and include its educational significance if applicable or the impact it could have on readers.
    • Copy of selection policy and library mission statement at my library.
    • ALA Library Bill of Rights
    • Good and bad reviews of the movie
    • Alternative works a student could read or watch
    • Reconsideration form if patron is not satisfied with rationale
  3. When talking to patron, I would listen to their concerns without getting on the defensive and attempt to sympathize with their concerns. In some cases, all an upset patron needs is to be able to vent and know that someone is listening to them.
  4. If needed, I would send the challenge up the chain of command.

This meets the recreational needs of teens and encourages teens to read the book.

Why did you include this movie? : The book was very popular, and I imagine that a lot of teens who read the book, and even some who did not were interested in this movie. The trailers were very exciting, which helps.

Reference Page:

Richard LaGavenese biography. Film Reference. Retrieved from http://www.filmreference.com/film/15/Richard-Lagravenese.html

Spiderman directed by Sam Raimi

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Spiderman

Spiderman directed by Sam Raimi ISBN: 0767898729

Plot Summary: Peter Parker lives with his aunt and uncle, has a crush on the girl next door, Mary Jane, and gets picked on my bullies. When on a classroom visit to a science lab, Peter is bitten by a rare spider and suddenly he has super strength, can shoot webs out of his wrists and stick to surfaces…just like a spider. At first, he looks at this as a way to make more money. But when his uncle is killed by the man Peter inadvertently helped, Peter knows his life has to change. He starts patrolling the streets of New York and helping the cops catch the bad guys. A lot of people appreciate his presence. But some see him as a threat, like J. Jonah Jameson, the head of the newspaper Daily Bugle. Or Norman Osborne, Harry’s best friend’s father. When Norman’s big contract with the government falls through, something cracks in him, and he is determined to get his revenge. As if that wasn’t enough, Mary Jane is finally starting to pay attention to Peter, and he has to help out his aunt so she can keep up with mortgage payments. With all the things he has to pay attention to, something’s bound to slip through the cracks.

Critical Evaluation: From what I have heard, this plot does not follow the comic books storyline very closely. That being said, it is still an entertaining movie to watch. I particularly like to see the struggles that superheroes have. Iron Man has a drinking and womanizing problem. The Hulk can’t control his anger and occasionally hurts the ones he cares about. Batman is crippled by his grief for his parents and dependent on gadgets to fight crime, which sometimes backfire on him.

For Spiderman, he feels responsible for his uncle’s death, and is reminded frequently of his uncle’s words, “With great power comes great responsibility.” As far as I can tell from this movie, one of his initial struggles is with understanding his powers. They come on rather suddenly and he takes some time to discover what he is capable of and honing these skills. His other, more lingering struggle is with his desire to be dependable in other areas of his life. He wants to be available for his aunt, for Mary Jane, for his studies, but keeps getting caught up in crime fighting. And he feels incapable of giving it up, partly because of his uncle, but partly because the people he cares about keep getting dragged into situations. Mary Jane is a frequent target, but Peter’s aunt is also involved at one point. The movie focuses more on his struggle with his aunt, Mary Jane, and financially. In later movies in the series, we see Peter falling behind on schoolwork, and frequently missing social engagements.

As this is the first movie in the series, a fair amount of time is spent building up the storyline, which means that the action takes a back burner. This is a frequent problem in superhero movies, but in series, some of these issues are cleared up after the first movie. While the beginning moves a little slower, I enjoy the whole movie, and feel that there is enough action in the beginning to carry excitement throughout the movie.

Reader’s Annotation: Mugger’s got your purse, or madman dangling a bus off a bridge? Not to worry; your friendly neighborhood Spiderman is here!

Information about the author: Sam Raimi was born in 1959 in Royal Oak, Michigan. He has been a fan of the cinema his whole life and made movies as a child with an 8mm camera. He attended Michigan State University in Lansing, Michigan and studied English.

His first film to garner the general public’s attention was “The Evil Dead.” He has since made movies in a variety of genres, and is praised for his strong visual style. He is married and has five children.

Genre: Superhero movie

Curriculum ties, if any: The sections about spiders could be interesting to compare to actual facts about spiders.

Booktalking Ideas: This movie was fairly popular on its own, but if I was suggesting it to teens, first I would ask teens what kind of a superhero power they would want. Then I would relate it back to the comic books it was based on, and appeal to teens’ interest in superheroes.

Reading Level/Interest Age:  Peter Parker is a high school student and at least a sophomore since he wants to buy a car in the movie. The movies do have some violence, but generally appeal to a wide age range including older children through adults.

Challenge Issues:

  • Violence

Defense Strategy:

  1. First, I would want to be familiar with movie. As I’ve watched this movie, I’d be aware of potential issues that could be challenged. In the case of a movie I had not read, I would want to have access to reviews.
  2. Then I would put together a rationale for why this movie is included in the collection. This rationale would include:
    • Bibliographic Citation of the movie.
    • A description of who the movie is best suited for.
    • A summary of the movie and applicable other information, such as biographical information about the director.
    • My justification for including the movie. This would include how it fits in with the selection policy and library mission statement, and include its educational significance if applicable or the impact it could have on readers.
    • Copy of selection policy and library mission statement at my library.
    • ALA Library Bill of Rights
    • Good and bad reviews of the movie
    • Alternative works a student could read or watch
    • Reconsideration form if patron is not satisfied with rationale
  3. When talking to patron, I would listen to their concerns without getting on the defensive and attempt to sympathize with their concerns. In some cases, all an upset patron needs is to be able to vent and know that someone is listening to them.
  4. If needed, I would send the challenge up the chain of command.

This meets the recreational needs of teens and has a positive message about doing what is right and responsibility.

Why did you include this movie? : Superhero movies are very popular. I thought this one had particular teen appeal because the main character is a teen.

Reference Page:

Biography for Sam Raimi (2013). Internet Movie Database. Retrieved from http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000600/bio

The Interrupters directed by Steve James

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The Interrupters Directed by Steven James, ISBN: 9781608836345

Plot Summary: This is the second of the two nonfiction movies I’m featuring about Chicago. It focuses on violence, especially gang violence in Chicago, and the organization that works to stop it. Ceasefire was started to combat gang violence in inner city Chicago. One of their most effective programs is the Interrupters program that employs former gang members to intervene during violent acts. These people are from the neighborhoods they work in, familiar with the gangs, but also the culture of violence that is so prevalent in these neighborhoods where violence is seen as the only way to respond to insults, other attacks, and rival gang members in another gang’s territory. The war between gangs in Chicago has claimed many innocent lives, most notably those of children and teens who aren’t in gangs. Through these interventions, Interrupters attempt to show teens that violence is not the only acceptable response, and in the process, lead some teens to a better life.

Critical Evaluation: This is in some ways a slower moving story than “Louder than a Bomb.” There are scenes of the movie that capture real violence and interventions, but for some reason, I didn’t feel as caught up in the moment of this story. For the most part, I think this is a very well made movie that perhaps most importantly, does not sugarcoat. The mood of the movie is especially well done. While some parts move slower than others, we are presented with mostly grim situations where teens can’t really see another way but violence. It is made all the more heartbreaking when we see the cases of innocent lives taken far too soon as a result of this violence. I think my favorite scene is that of a teen’s funeral, and the tearful goodbyes that his classmates make, as well as the speech one Interrupter makes to rally for a reevaluation of the current neighborhood climate. There are hopeful moments, as when one man, through an intervention, does not retaliate and eventually gets a job. However, there is still something bittersweet about moments like this, where the job is not seen as very fulfilling. Perhaps this is meant to question the system where low income people are expected to work low paying, unfulfilling jobs in the face of the apparent riches available for gang members.

Still, characters are very well developed here. Each of the Interrupters has a chance to tell their story: how they got into gangs and violence, and what led them to become an Interrupter. One such story is that of a Latino man who went to jail for killing another teen. He is shown working with children in his old neighborhood and looking at the topic of violence through the medium of art. Several teens are also featured throughout the movie, like one teen in a rehabilitation house after going to a juvenile detention center. The Interrupter spends a lot of time with this teen, not only working through her anger and violent tendencies, but also demonstrating a better way to live, and pampering her so that she sees her worth and beauty.

Reader’s Annotation: Being a teenager is hard, especially if you live in the violence torn inner city streets where teens and children can get shot with no warning. Watch this movie for one look at a solution to the violence, and how teens can do their part too.

Information about the director: Steve James is an award winning director, producer and co-editor for the movie “Hoop Dreams.”  Most of his movies have been documentaries.  Quite a few have won awards.

For creating “The Interrupters,” Steve says he was inspired by an article by Chicago writer, Alex Kotlowitz, to make a movie about Ceasefire. He felt that a movie had the potential to reach a broader audience on this issue.  However, it was a difficult movie to film because it required assessing each situation to see if it was safe enough for Steve and his crew to get close enough to film.

Genre: Nonfiction movie

Curriculum ties, if any: This movie has been used in high school sociology classes before, and would provide an opportunity in a variety of classes to discuss violence and possible solutions or alternatives to the use of violence.

Booktalking Ideas: This is a movie I would encourage compassionate teens to watch, so I would impress upon them the real life violence encountered and the solutions Ceasefire comes up with to combat them. In general for teens, I might ask them if they are aware of gangs in their neighborhood, or ever hear about teens in their areas getting killed by gang violence. Once it becomes slightly more relatable, I think teens would be interested to see what happens next.

Reading Level/Interest Age:  The featured Interrupters in this movie are adults, but most of the people that they work with are teens. This is probably not a movie that a teen would gravitate to for entertainment, but I think conscientious older teens would value the story and a look at an epidemic that affects them whether they live in Chicago or not.

Challenge Issues:

  • Language
  • Violence

Defense Strategy:

  1. First, I would want to be familiar with movie. As I’ve watched this movie, I’d be aware of potential issues that could be challenged. In the case of a book or movie I was not as familiar with, I would want to have access to reviews.
  2. Then I would put together a rationale for why this movie is included in the collection. This rationale would include:
    • Bibliographic Citation of the movie.
    • A description of who the movie is best suited for.
    • A summary of the movie and applicable other information, such as biographical information about the author.
    • My justification for including the movie. This would include how it fits in with the selection policy and library mission statement, and include its educational significance if applicable or the impact it could have on readers.
    • Copy of selection policy and library mission statement at my library.
    • ALA Library Bill of Rights
    • Good and bad reviews of the movie
    • Alternative works a student could read or watch
    • Reconsideration form if patron is not satisfied with rationale
  3. When talking to patron, I would listen to their concerns without getting on the defensive and attempt to sympathize with their concerns. In some cases, all an upset patron needs is to be able to vent and know that someone is listening to them.
  4. If needed, I would send the challenge up the chain of command.

This is an important movie to watch because it represents a situation that is very real for some teens. Just today, I read an article in the paper about a 14 year old boy who was shot while riding through his former neighborhood. This movie represents teens who live that life day to day, but also provides a glimpse of the situation to other teens. This movie has the potential to change the way teens think about gangs and violence, and in some cases, to explore alternative solutions to these situations. Censoring it because of the language or difficult situations does nothing to help solve the problem.

Why did you include this movie? : After talking to my sister, who watched it in her sociology class, I decided that it did apply more to teens than I originally anticipated. It does not have quite the same hopeful ending as “Louder than a Bomb,” but presents a reality I think it is important to address.

Reference Page:

Filmmakers (2011). The Interrupters website. Retrieved from http://interrupters.kartemquin.com/filmmakers

Khan, A. (February 14, 2012). Q&A: Filmmaker Steve James on making “The Interrupters.” PBS Frontline. Retrieved from http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/social-issues/interrupters/qa-filmmaker-steve-james-on-making-the-interrupters/

Louder than a Bomb, directed by Jon Siskel and Greg Jacobs

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Louder than a Bomb Directed by Greg Jacobs and Jon Siskel, ASIN: B006UTDG42

Plot Summary: I’d like to feature two locally made movies in this blog that I think have appeal for teens, though are quite different than what one might expect. The first is “Louder than a Bomb,” about the largest teen poetry slam in the country of the same name. The movie follows four schools competing in the slam, and four students on each of those teams. Each student comes from a different neighborhood and a different background, but each share a love of poetry and all get to know each other through this slam. The movie chronicles the journeys of each group as they prepare for the slam, and leads the viewer through the slam, through epic, beautiful poems, triumphs and disappointments.

Critical Evaluation: As a lover of slam poetry and with a vested interest in Chicago, I may be biased when I say how much I really enjoyed this film. The strongest element of this movie is the character development. The poetry may have been quite good, but it is more of a vehicle for understanding each of the teens portrayed. The movie begins and ends with our characters, seeing where they started out, and where they are headed afterwards. Interspersed with footage of teens practicing and ultimately performing are interviews with the teens, with their parents, with the poetry coaches. Everything comes together, including the poetry they recite, to give us a better picture of who each of these teens are.

Yet the movie also demonstrates rising action and for me, suspense as teens get closer to the slam and then perform and witness their scores. The energy at the competition is palpable, and I felt the gamut of emotions while watching: happy, sad, angry, nervous, and eventually some sense of relief to know the conclusion. We don’t quite get the end we may have expected, but there are still joyful moments and recognition for each of the poets featured.  In my mind, it would be hard to say what the movie is missing, and hard to make it any better without making it longer. I could have wished for more of the poetry performances, but quite truthfully, there was a delicate balance to each element. There was enough development of backstory of both the slam and the teens through interviews and views of their day to day life. There was quite a bit of poetry throughout the movie.

Since this was a documentary featuring teens, it occurs to me to think about the effect the movie might have had on them. I think that it really delved into the teens lives, some more than others, but always to a healthy level. I’d like to think that teens and parents felt comfortable with everything that was featured in the movie, because it did end up portraying the teens in a very positive light. And it allowed each to self-reflect on their poetry and on their lives, in a way they might not have done otherwise. In this way, I can hope their lives will be better for participating in the movie. And I would say that a teen who watches this movie will be better because of it, as it shows the amazing potential a teen has to achieve and produce beautiful works of art. It should give them hope to see how many adults appreciate and support their artistic endeavors or whatever hobby they choose to pursue.

Reader’s Annotation: Poetry is not just confined to your textbooks: it can be a rap, a story of life as an inner city teen, a way to connect to others and express yourself. Experience four teens in Chicago as they prepare and compete in the country’s largest poetry slam in this electric and inspiring movie.

Information about the author: Siskel/Jacobs Productions is a Chicago based film company founded in 2005. They first produced a History Channel program called “102 Minutes that Changed America” about the attacks on 9/11. They are currently at work on episodes for National Geographic Channel’s “Witness” series, that focuses on disasters around the world, from Hurricane Katrina to Japan’s disaster as a result of a tidal wave.

Greg Jacobs served as VP/Chief Creative Officer at Towers Productions, where he oversaw the content of more than two hundred documentaries on five different networks. He graduated from Yale University and got a master’s degree in history from Ohio State University. Jon Siskel created a variety of shows for various networks. He now serves on the board of directors of Free Spirit Media, a youth media organization out of Chicago.

Genre: Nonfiction movie

Curriculum ties, if any: This would be a fantastic movie to show in a class during a poetry unit, leading into the teens writing their own poetry.

Booktalking Ideas: To encourage teens to watch this movie I would highlight the alternative format of poetry, that is more similar to rapping. I might also ask teens if any of them have written fiction or poetry before. Then I would ask them if any of them have performed their works before, which would lead into describing what teens do in this movie.

Reading Level/Interest Age:  The teens featured in this movie were all seniors in high school at the time of filming. I think this has broader appeal, and that younger and older viewers can also appreciate it. It seems best suited to high school students partly because it tells their story, but also because they will best be able to relate to the teens in the movie and understand where they are coming from.

Challenge Issues:

  • Language
  • Mention of violence

Defense Strategy:

  1. First, I would want to be familiar with movie. As I’ve watched this movie, I’d be aware of potential issues that could be challenged. In the case of a book or movie I was not as familiar with, I would want to have access to reviews.
  2. Then I would put together a rationale for why this movie is included in the collection. This rationale would include:
    • Bibliographic Citation of the movie.
    • A description of who the movie is best suited for.
    • A summary of the movie and applicable other information, such as biographical information about the author.
    • My justification for including the movie. This would include how it fits in with the selection policy and library mission statement, and include its educational significance if applicable or the impact it could have on readers.
    • Copy of selection policy and library mission statement at my library.
    • ALA Library Bill of Rights
    • Good and bad reviews of the movie
    • Alternative works a student could read or watch
    • Reconsideration form if patron is not satisfied with rationale
  3. When talking to patron, I would listen to their concerns without getting on the defensive and attempt to sympathize with their concerns. In some cases, all an upset patron needs is to be able to vent and know that someone is listening to them.
  4. If needed, I would send the challenge up the chain of command.

As I’ve mentioned before, I think this is important for teens to have access to. It has descriptions of violence, some coarse language, and difficult situations presented, but it shows teens coming from somewhat difficult backgrounds and still making something positive out of that background. Will slam poetry keep some of these teens from joining gangs or throwing away their education? Maybe!

Why did you include this movie? : I love this movie, and want more people to be exposed to it because I think it has a great story and message. It represents the positive contribution that teens can make to the world, and the potential of art to connect teens across their seemingly different backgrounds.

Reference Page (if directly citing material):

About the filmmakers (2011). Louder than a Bomb website. Retrieved from http://www.louderthanabombfilm.com/about-the-filmmakers.php